Course Descriptions

Philosophy Undergraduate Courses

The following is a list of courses taught by our faculty in philosophy as they appear in the University's course catalog. However, please note that some of these courses are only offered once per year, and some are only offered every other year. Please consult the Registrar's page to view the list of courses that are currently available in philosophy.

PHL 1000:  Introduction to Philosophy (3). Offered in Fall and Spring. A general introduction to the basic patterns and methods of philosophy as presented through representative thinkers. (GEN ED: Liberal Studies Experience)

PHL 1040:  Critical Thinking Skills (3). Offered in Fall and Spring. An introduction to the art of critical thinking, including identifying problems, locating assumptions and analyzing their impact on the products of thought, assessing causal claims, learning problem solving strategies, and examining creativity.

PHL 1100:  Logic I (3). Offered in Fall and Spring. This course is an introduction to logical reasoning. It will include the study of truth-functions, translations of English sentences into logical notation, truth-tables, deductions, and some fallacy identification. The concepts of validity, consistency, tautology, contradiction, and logical equivalence are introduced. Additional topics, such as category syllogisms, inductive reasoning, and quantification may be included at the discretion of the instructor. (GEN ED: Liberal Studies Experience)

PHL 1501:  Mind, Knowledge, and Reality (3). Offered in Fall and Spring.  An introduction to the special problems, topics or issues in philosophy from historical and social perspectives.  The subject matter of this course will vary.  (GEN ED: Liberal Studies Experience)

PHL 1502:  Philosophy and Popular Culture (3). Offered in Fall and Spring.  An introduction to the special problems, topics or issues in philosophy from aesthetics perspectives.  The subject matter of this course will vary.  (GEN ED: Integrative Learning Experience, Theme: “How We Tell Stories”)

PHL 1503:  Selves, Bodies, and Cultural Diversity (3). Offered in Fall and Spring.  An introduction to the special problems, topics or issues in philosophy from local to global perspectives.  The subject matter of this course will vary.  (GEN ED: Liberal Studies Experience)

PHL 1530 - 1549:  Selected Topics (1-4). On Demand.  Courses in philosophy that vary in content at the discretion of the instructor.

PHL 2000:  Philosophy, Society, and Ethics (3). Offered in Fall and Spring. An introduction to ethical reasoning and an examination of moral problems in contemporary social issues. (GEN ED: Liberal Studies Experience)

PHL 2010:  Animal Philosophy and Ethics (3). Offered in Fall.This class provides an introduction to animal philosophy and ethics. In particular, students study historical as well as recent animal philosophy tracing questions that may include the critique of “the question of the animal,” the human/animal binary, animal rights, anthropocentrism, philosophical anthropology, and the relationship between humans and animals including the philosophical discourse around the “animality” of humanity itself. (GEN ED: Integrative Learning Experience, Theme: “Human-Animal Bond”)

PHL 2013:  Philosophy of Art (3). Offered in Fall. This course is an introduction to philosophical problems in our understanding and appreciation of the arts.  Topics covered may include the definition of "art", the philosophical underpinnings of art criticism, the role of experience in art appreciation, and the value of art. (GEN ED: Integrative Learning Experience, Theme: “Imagination, Innovation, and Meaning”)

PHL 2015:  Environmental Ethics (3). Offered in Fall and Spring. This course is an introduction to the ethical dimensions of environmental issues. Students will have the opportunity to study theoretical perspectives such as deep ecology, ecofeminism, Native American views of the land, and social ecology. The course will also consider environmental ethical issues such as the moral status of nature, pesticide use, environmental racism, the treatment of animals, deforestation, world population growth, and what it means to live an ecologically responsible life. (GEN ED: Integrative Learning Experience, Theme: “Sustainability and Global Resources”)

PHL 2100:  Logic II (3). Offered in Spring. A study of some major systems of logic, including a formal study of truth functions and quantification. The notions of proof, theorem and axiom are defined and some theory of logic is included. At the discretion of the instructor, additional topics may be included (for example, the Logic of Relations, Boolean Algebra Systems, Modal Logic, the Logic of Probability or Inductive Logic). Prerequisite: PHL 1100 or permission of the instructor.

PHL 2500:  Independent Study (1-4). On Demand.  A course that is designed by the student.  This course could be thought of as an extended research project in philosophy that is chosen by the student.  Typically, students will identify an area of philosophy that they wish to study in more depth and will be guided in their studies through regular meetings with a philosophy faculty member.  Student projects must be proposed and approved by the relevant faculty member, the chair of the Department of Philosophy and Religion, and the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences.  Interested students should contact a philosophy faculty member for further advice.

PHL 2530 - 2549:  Selected Topics (1-4). On Demand.  Courses in philosophy that vary in content at the discretion of the instructor.

PHL 3000:  Ancient Philosophy (3). Offered in Fall. What does it mean to live well? Greek philosophers such as Plato and Aristotle answered that the good life isn't measured by what you have, so much as the sort of person that you are -- the sort of "soul" you possess. Their theory of the soul is the focus of our class. Research from contemporary studies in psychology and cognitive science will be included in the course.   Prerequisite: one course in philosophy or consent of the instructor. (GEN ED: Historical Studies Designation; Liberal Studies Experience)

PHL 3013:  Philosophical Aesthetics (3). Offered in Spring, alternate years. This is an advanced course in the theory of aesthetics in contemporary philosophy.  Topics may include the nature of aesthetic experience, arguments for realism and antirealism for aesthetic properties, theories of beauty, evolutionary aesthetics, aesthetics and cognitive science, and the relationship between aesthetic judgments and ethical judgments.  (GEN ED: Liberal Studies Experience)

PHL 3015:  Medical Ethics (3).  Offered in Spring.  This course aims to introduce students from a variety of backgrounds with an interest in health care to the central issues and controversies in medical ethics. The goal is to prepare students to enter the growing fields of medical practice and research equipped with an adequate knowledge of the ethical developments and issues pertaining to health care practice and research as well as the appropriate capabilities to make intelligent and reasoned choices within their professional practices.  (GEN ED: Liberal Studies Experience)

PHL 3020:  Metaphysics (3).  Offered in Fall, alternate years.  This course will provide an advanced introduction to metaphysics, a branch of philosophy concerned with questions and issues that arise out of the study of the nature of reality.  Issues discussed in this course may include:  What kinds of things exist in the world?  How is metaphysics related to the sciences, and other branches of philosophy?  What is the ontology of numbers and abstract entities?  What is the nature of the self?  How do we reconcile between free will and determinism?  We will draw on readings from both historical and contemporary sources in Western philosophy. (GEN ED: Liberal Studies Experience)

PHL 3030:  Feminist Philosophy (3). Offered in Spring. This course examines conceptual and normative issues in contemporary feminist theory. Issues to be discussed include power and the production of knowledge, resistance, violence against women, sex and gender, the interrelatedness of gender, race, class, and sexuality, body image, the personal as political, and the relation between feminist theory and activism. The class also considers western and non-western feminist discussion of these themes. The goal is for each student to gain an appreciation of the diversity and complexity of feminist thought, as well as insight concerning the relation between women's experiences and feminist theorizing. (GEN ED: Integrative Learning Experience, Theme: “Revolutions: Social and Political”)

PHL 3040:  Social and Political Philosophy (3).  Offered in Fall, alternate years. This course examines some of the major developments in Western political thought. Through a philosophical lens, students will examine the various and changing concepts that shape current political arrangements. (WRITING)

PHL 3050:  Philosophy of Race (3).  Offered in Fall, alternate years.  What is race? What is the relationship between the category of race and racism? What is the relationship between race and personal identity? How do multiracial identities race questions about the meaning of race and its relationship to identity? What is the relationship between racialization and society? What can philosophy help us to understand about race? What are the relationships between race, gender, class, and sexuality? How has the idea of race influenced the discipline and practice of philosophy? This course will examine the metaphysical, epistemological, social, political, and ethical dimensions of race. Class readings will include both historical and contemporary philosophical approaches to race and racism. (GEN ED: Integrative Learning Experience, Theme: “Intersections: Race, Class, and Gender”)

PHL 3200:  Modern Philosophy (3). Offered in Spring. This course examines modern philosophy's “epistemological turn”.  According to thinkers such as Descartes, Hume, and Kant, the way to find out what there is in the world (metaphysics) is to investigate how we know about the world (epistemology).  The course charts the theoretical philosophy of these three major philosophers with an eye to the central epistemological questions in their work and, in particular, their interaction with skepticism.  One of the central questions we will ask is: how can we articulate the problem of skepticism, and can the skeptic’s problem be solved?  Prerequisite: one course in philosophy or consent of the instructor. (GEN ED: Historical Studies Designation; Liberal Studies Experience)

PHL 3300:  A Critique of Worldmaking (3). Offered in Spring. This course studies the major developments in recent analytic philosophy which have led to a radical challenge to common sense, Nelson’s Goodman’s Critique of Worldmaking. The basic principle is that worlds are made by making world-versions. The critique is a comparative study of world-versions and their making. We assess how well such a critique has advanced analytic philosophy. Our readings may be drawn from philosophers such as: Ayer, Carnap, Wittgenstein, Dewey, James, Goodman, Quine, Kuhn, and Rorty. (GEN ED: Junior Writing in the Discipline) Prerequisite: RC 2001 or its equivalent. 

PHL 3400:  Contemporary Continental Philosophy (3). Offered in Fall. This course examines some important philosophers and movements in continental philosophy. Philosophical movements such as Phenomenology, Existentialism, Critical Theory, Feminism, Postcolonial Theory, and Poststructuralism will be discussed. (GEN ED: Junior Writing in the Discipline )Prerequisite: RC 2001 or its equivalent. 

PHL 3500:  Independent Study (1-4). On Demand. A course that is designed by the student.  This course could be thought of as an extended research project in philosophy that is chosen by the student.  Typically, students will identify an area of philosophy that they wish to study in more depth and will be guided in their studies through regular meetings with a philosophy faculty member.  Student projects must be proposed and approved by the relevant faculty member, the chair of the Department of Philosophy and Religion, and the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences.  Interested students should contact a philosophy faculty member for further advice.

PHL 3520:  Instructional Assistance (1). On Demand. A supervised experience in the instructional process of a philosophy course through direct participation in a classroom situation. Graded on a Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing. May be repeated for a total credit of three semester hours.

PHL 3530-3549:  Selected Topics (1-4). On Demand. Courses in philosophy that vary in content at the discretion of the instructor.

PHL 3550:  Philosophy of Mind (3). Offered in Spring. This course will examine some fundamental questions that arise in the philosophy of mind: What does it mean to say that a person has a mind? Are mental states (such as beliefs and desires) nothing but brain states, or are they states of a different kind? Do robots or animals have minds? The course will also provide a historical survey of various philosophical theories of mind, including substance dualism, philosophical and methodological behaviorism, identity theories, functionalism and connectionism. (GEN ED: Liberal Studies Experience)

PHL 3600:  Philosophy of Science (3). Offered in Spring. An investigation of the foundations, structure, actual attainments, and ideals of the sciences. Prerequisite: one course in science or science education or philosophy or consent of instructor. (GEN ED: Liberal Studies Experience)

PHL 4000:  Nature of Knowledge (3). Offered in Spring. A study of the traditional problems of the origin, nature, and limitations of knowledge. What do we know and how do we know it? Prerequisites: PHL 2800 and one additional course in philosophy or consent of the instructor.

PHL 4300:  Ethical Theory (3). Offered in Fall. An examination of some major ethical theories and issues raised in relation to epistemology and language, such as the status of knowledge in ethics and the function of ethical language. Prerequisites: Three semester hours in a PHL course at or above the 2000 level or consent of the instructor.

PHL 4510: Senior Honors Thesis: Philosophy (3). On Demand. Independent study and research, directed by a member of the Philosophy faculty in the Department of Philosophy and Religion and a member of another department appropriate to the topic selected by the student. Prerequisites: six semester hours of Honors work below the 4000 level.

PHL 4549:  Philosophy Seminar (3). Offered in Fall and Spring. An intensive study of special problems, topics, or issues related to the study of philosophy. The subject matter of this course will vary and barring duplication of subject matter, a student may repeat the course for credit. Prerequisites: PHL 2800 and one course in philosophy or consent of the instructor. Prerequisite: Six semester hours in PHL courses at or above the 2000 level or consent of the instructor. 

PHL 4700:  Senior Research: Philosophy (3). Offered in Spring. Designed for majors in Philosophy. Development and completion of an independent research project in the context of a seminar in which the student’s ideas, drafts and thesis are questioned and defended. In addition to the discussion of each student’s work, issues regarding the nature of philosophy will be discussed. This course provides an opportunity to utilize philosophical skills in a systematic analysis of a philosophical problem. Each student will develop a thesis to be presented and defended in a public forum.Prerequisites: nine semester hours in PHL courses at or above the 2000 level or consent of the instructor. (GEN ED: Capstone Experience)

PHL 4900:  Internship: Philosophy (3-6). On Demand. Field work in applied philosophy. Proposal must be approved by the philosophy faculty. Graded on an S/U basis. 

 

Religious Studies Undergraduate Courses

REL 1010:  Religion and Imaginary Worlds (3). Offered in Fall and Spring. This course will explore various expressions of religious imagination in cultural products such as literature that reflect or contribute to religion and religious ideas. A variety of types of literature (including biblical and modern) will be used. The class is organized around the literary critique of religious issues and the postmodern crisis of belief. The class will also consider literary theory and the critical issues involved in transferring literature to other media forms. (GEN ED: Literary Studies Designation; Liberal Studies Experience)

REL 1100:   Religion and Contemporary Issues (3). Offered in Fall.  This course examines the relationship between religion and the issues that confront our world. Through the exploration of writings of religious significance and other material and media artifacts (art, architecture, music, media, political rhetoric, film, etc.), the course considers how cultural and social influences shape religious expression and contribute to religion as a force in contemporary life both locally and globally. (GEN ED: Social Science Designation; Liberal Studies Experience) (Global Learning Opportunity course)

REL 1110:   Religions of the World (3). Offered in Fall and Spring. This course introduces the major living religions of the world. (GEN ED: Liberal Studies Experience)

REL 1120:   Confronting Death (3). Offered in Spring. How do different religious traditions think about illness and end of life issues? What rituals do adherents perform? This course explores how religious belief and practice impact treatment decision making and includes consideration of specific issues such as suicide, euthanasia, and organ donation. It also examines funeral and bereavement rituals for both disposition of bodies as well as for individual and community mourning and support.  (GEN ED: Liberal Studies Experience)

REL 1530 - 1549:  Selected Topics (1-4). On Demand. Courses in religious studies that vary in content at the discretion of the instructor.

REL 2010:  Old Testament:  The Jewish Scriptures (3). Offered in Fall and Spring. An analysis of Old Testament literature as the product of the Hebrew people, students will have the opportunity to examine selected documents in terms of their literary structure, historical context, and religious perspective. (GEN ED: Literary Studies Designation; Liberal Studies Experience)

REL 2020:  The New Testament (3). Offered in Fall and Spring. An analysis of early Christian literature as the product of the lives of the first followers of Jesus Christ. Students will have the opportunity to examine selected documents in terms of their literary structure, audience, historical context, religious perspective, and their relation to the broader Christian community and Western culture. (GEN ED: Literary Studies Designation; Integrative Learning Experience, Theme: “How We Tell Stories”))

REL 2030:  Islamic Literature (3). Offered in Spring. An exploration of the Qur'an and of works that have shaped, illustrated, or supplemented Islamic beliefs and practices. (GEN ED: Literary Studies Designation; Liberal Studies Experience)

REL 2110:  Judaism (3). Offered in Fall. An examination of the history, literature, and faith of post-exilic Judaism, with concentration on selected topics and periods. (GEN ED: Historical Studies Designation; Liberal Studies Experience)

REL 2120:  Christianity (3). Offered in Spring. An exploration of Christianity from the early period through the Enlightenment and rise of contemporary Christian movements, students will explore the history of the church, its doctrinal emphases, and its practice in a variety of locations and time periods. (GEN ED: Historical Studies Designation; Liberal Studies Experience)

REL 2130:  Islamic Religion and Culture (3). Offered in Fall. A selective survey of the religion and its expression in Islamic civilization from the time of the prophet Muhammad to the contemporary Islamic revival. (GEN ED: Liberal Studies Experience)

REL 2140:  Hinduism (3). Offered in Fall. An interdisciplinary examination of complex Hindu religious and philosophical traditions from Vedic culutre to the contemporary period, covering such topics as deity, guru, cosmos, body, ritual, karma, dharma, and yoga.

REL 2150:  Buddhism (3). Offered in Spring. An interdisciplinary examination of the Theravada, Mahayana, and Vajrayana systems of Buddhist thought and practice, charting their development on the South Asian subcontinent and eventual emergence as a religio-cultural force in East Asia, Europe, and North America. (GEN ED: Historical Studies Designation; Liberal Studies Experience) (Global Learning Opportunity Course)

REL 2180: Life without God (3). Offered in Fall, alternate years. What does life look like once we entertain the possibility that God does not exist?  Can a life without God be a purposeful and meaningful one?  Pursuing answers to such questions, this course introduces students to atheism, naturalism, and humanism, worldviews enjoying greater acceptance today than ever before in human history.  Using interdisciplinary resources from psychology and biology to philosophy and religious studies, the course directly facilitates both critical self-scrutiny as well as global awareness. (GEN ED: Liberal Studies Experience)

REL 2210: Gods, Ghosts, and Ancestors (3). Offered in Fall, alternate years. This course introduces students to the main religious traditions of China and the enduring religious themes and philosophical issues which have informed traditional Chinese literature, society, culture and politics. Students will examine the origins, rise, and endurance of Chinese popular religion, Confucianism in its social and political forms, Daoism as a philosophical movement and as a series of religious innovations, and Buddhism’s transmission into China and its subsequent flourishing and transformation of Chinese culture and society. In each instance students will examine a broad array of phenomena, from scriptural texts to hagiography, from ritual manuals to medical texts, from miracle stories of talking animals to poetic flights into the starry heaven and beyond, from tales of ghosts and ancestors to accounts of the deeds of shamans and sages.  (Global Learning Opportunity course)

REL 2530 - 2549:  Selected Topics (1-4). On Demand. Courses in religious studies that vary in content at the discretion of the instructor.

REL 2500:  Independent Study (1-4). On Demand. A course that is designed by the student.  This course could be thought of as an extended research project in religious studies that is chosen by the student.  Typically, students will identify an area of religious studies that they wish to study in more depth and will be guided in their studies through regular meetings with a religious studies faculty member.  Student projects must be proposed and approved by the relevant faculty member, the chair of the Department of Philosophy and Religion, and the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences.  Interested students should contact a religious studies faculty member for further advice.

REL 3010:  Biblical Prophets: Justice and Hope (3). Offered in Spring. A study of the prophetic movement and its literature in ancient Israel and the ancient Near East (MULTI-CULTURAL)

REL 3020:  After Jesus: Paul to Chirstianity (3). Offered in Fall. This class will examine the development of a rich variety of communities, traditions and theologies that developed in years after Jesus’ life. It will explore the development of Paul’s communities and the groups and thinkers who appropriated, reinterpreted and/ or opposed Paul’s work in both antiquity and the contemporary world.

REL 3030:  Gender, Sexuality, and the Bible (3). Offered in Fall, alternate years. This course provides an extensive inquiry into women's stories and images in the Hebrew Bible, New Testament and Apocrypha. Feminist biblical criticism will be emphasized along with a careful study of what we can know about the lives of women in the periods in which these texts were composed. Prerequisite: REL 2010 or REL 2020 or permission of the instructor. (WRITING; CROSS-DISCIPLINARY)

REL 3040:  Bible  and Science (3). Offered in Fall, alternate years. An exploration of the historical development of Western modern science in light of its interactions with biblical theology and interpretation, and of the key topics and issues of the current debate/discussion concerning biblical teaching and contemporary science.

REL 3100:  Church and State in Latin America (3). Offered in Spring. Christianity in Latin America takes several forms, most notably through the controversial movements involving liberation theology. This course will explore the relationship between Church and State in Latin America, treating religion as one component of a multidisciplinary approach to the problems of poverty and social injustice both historically and contemporarily. (GEN ED: Integrative Learning Experience , Theme: “Las Americas”)

REL 3110:  Religion in America (3). Offered in Fall. An examination of religious beliefs and practice in the United States. Prerequisite: REL 1110 or permission of the instructor. (GEN ED: Integrative Learning Experience, Theme: “American Culture: Past and Present”

REL 3120:  African Thought (3). Offered in Spring. A selective survey of insights, systems of thought, and cosmologies of traditional folk religions, of African versions of global religions and of contemporary intellectuals. Prerequisite: REL 1110 or permission of the instructor. (GEN ED: Liberal Studies Experience) (Global Learning Opportunity course)

REL 3160:  Life and Teachings of Jesus (3).  Offered in Spring, alternate years.  An examination of the historical Jesus of Nazareth, his life, message, and teachings, using the various methods of Biblical Criticism. The class will focus on what can be known about the historical Jesus and different methodologies used in that pursuit.

REL 3170:  Religion and Violence (3).  Offered in Spring, alternate years.  Why does the history of world religions admit to several moments of violence? Why do the religious commit acts of violence not only against others but against themselves as well, for example, through acts of sacrifice and penance? Employing a multi-disciplinary approach, the course will address not only the historical, and what could possibly be perceived as the accidental, nature of violence in religion, but also and provocatively the structural role of violence in religion. (GEN ED: Integrative Learning Experience, Theme: “War and Peace”) (Global Learning Opportunity course)

REL 3500:  Independent Study (1-4). On Demand. A course that is designed by the student.  This course could be thought of as an extended research project in religious studies that is chosen by the student.  Typically, students will identify an area of religious studies that they wish to study in more depth and will be guided in their studies through regular meetings with a religious studies faculty member.  Student projects must be proposed and approved by the relevant faculty member, the chair of the Department of Philosophy and Religion, and the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences.  Interested students should contact a religious studies faculty member for further advice.

REL 3520:  Instructional Assistance (1). On Demand. A supervised experience in the instructional process of a religious studies course through direct participation in a classroom situation. Graded on a Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing. May be repeated for a total credit of three semester hours.

REL 3530-3549:  Selected Topics (1-4). On Demand. Courses in religious studies that vary in content at the discretion of the instructor.

REL 3560:  Religion and Science Fiction (3).  Offered in Spring, alternate years. This course will boldly go where no one has gone before through a variety of texts, films and media, in order to discover the ways science fiction authors imagined religion, class, race, culture, economics, and history in this and other worlds. We will analyze contemporary science fiction novels, films, television shows, and short stories, looking at how authors construct their worlds and reconstruct ours.

REL 3600:  Study Tour Abroad (3-6). On Demand. An intensive course exploring religious ideas and expression at a remote site. (WID)

REL 3700:  Theories of Religion (3). Offered in Spring. An introduction to major issues and the methods employed in the academic study of religion. Students will focus on acquiring the skills necessary to accomplish research in the field of religous studies. Prerequisite: RC 2001 or its equivalent. (GEN ED: Junior Writing in the Discipline)

REL 3710:  Religion, Ecology and Biology (3).  Offered in Fall.  This course introduces the student to the ecological and biological study of religion. The course specifically considers the extent to which evolutionary theory illumines the origins, functions, and continuing vitality of religious belief, behavior, and experience, taking time along the way to consider the unscientific theory of intelligent design and the controversies associated therewith. In addition to a general evolutionary account of religion, the course assesses the role of infectious disease ecologies in the evocation of religious diversity. Prerequisite: RC 2001 or its equivalent.(GEN ED: Junior Writing in the Discipline)

REL 3715:  Biblical Interpretation (3). Offered in Spring. An intensive examination of methods and issues in biblical interpretation, with extensive experience in the interpretation of specific biblical texts from both testaments. Major issues in the history of interpretation will be discussed, with emphasis on contemporary methods. Prerequisites: REL 2010 or REL 2020 and junior or senior status, or permission of the instructor. (GEN ED: Junior Writing in the Discipline)

REL 3725:  Religion and Empire (3).  Offered in Fall, alternate years. This course explores the nature of empire and its conflicted relationship with religion. It will cover different case studies from differing geographic and historic locales. Religion and empire have moved hand in hand shaping the way that both colonizer and colonized understood, practiced, and created religion. In the process of expanding their world (and altering other worlds), colonizers came to think about themselves in terms of new identities; and colonized peoples forged their own identities in the midst of struggle. Prerequisite: RC 2001 or its equivalent. (GEN ED: Junior Writing in the Discipline)

REL 3740:  Religion and Social Theory (3).  Offered in Spring, alternate years.  An examination of the different explanations of the role of religion in the world and its function within human society. The class will focus on the specific application of such theory to real world religious phenomena.Prerequisite: RC 2001 or its equivalent. (GEN ED: Junior Writing in the Discipline)

REL 3750:  Minds, Brain, and Religion (3). Offered in Spring. An introduction to the psychological study of religious belief, experience, and behavior through a survey of various sub-disciplines within psychology: e.g., Freudian psychoanalysis, existential psychology, object relations theory, attachement theory, cognitive psychology, and evolutionary psychology. Prerequisite: RC 2001 or its equivalent. (GEN ED: Junior Writing in the Discipline)

REL 3760:  Reason and Religion (3).  Offered in Spring, alternate years.  This course focuses on the analysis and discussion of religion in general rather than on any particular belief system and is a field of study that has been embraced by both believers and nonbelievers. The course discusses texts by secular and religious commentators about the nature of religion and of religious experience, and considers epistemological, ontological, logical, aesthetic, and ethical concepts and claims of religions.  Prerequisite: RC 2001 or its equivalent. (GEN ED: Junior Writing in the Discipline)

REL 3770:  Religion, Gender, and the Body (3).  Offered in Spring, alternate years.  This course examines how religions configure the human body as both a problem and an opportunity. Students will examine theories concerning the social and cultural construction of gender, sexuality, and embodiment, and the implications of these theories for the study of religion. Case studies will help students gain proficiency in applying the theoretical insights of cultural and gender studies not only to specific cultural and historical settings, but also to similar phenomena in other times and place.  Prerequisite: RC 2001 or its equivalent. (GEN ED: Junior Writing in the Discipline)

REL 4115:  Religion and Cultural Forms (3). Offered in Spring. An examination of the way religious themes and issues have found expression in various types of cultural forms such as literature, art, myth, ritual, etc. 

REL 4510:  Senior Honors Thesis (3). On Demand. Independent study and research. Honors thesis directed by a faculty member in Religious Studies and a member of an affiliated department appropriate to the topic selected by the student. Prerequisite: completion of six semester hours of Honors work below the 4000 level.

REL 4700:  Senior Seminar (3). Offered in Fall and Spring. An intensive study of special problems, topics, or issues related to the study of religion. The subject matter of this course will vary with the topic selected being focused on literature in the fall and culture in the spring. Prerequisite: completion of at least six semester hours of religious studies (REL) course work at the 3000 or 4000 level including one methods course, i.e., one course in the REL 37XX sequence. (GEN ED: Capstone Experience)

REL 4900:  Internship (3-6). On Demand. Graded on an S/U basis.

For graduate courses (5000 and above) refer to the Graduate Bulletin.